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Gorislav Sobolev
Gorislav Sobolev

Combat Wings The Great Battles Of World War 2


Shine the Tim Stone light onto the clouds! (It's the shape of a tank with wings.) The sequel to 2009's Combat Wings: Battle Of Britain, this time expanding to Combat Wings: The Great Battles Of World War II (maybe it's just me, but I didn't think the battles were that great) has a fancy new trailer, and ten completely gorgeous screenshots. It's out in March, and it appeals to my eyes.




Combat Wings The Great Battles of World War 2



Combat Wings recreates the most interesting battles of WWII. The player can fight in different theaters of war, flying actual historical planes: Spitfire, P-51 Mustang, and many others. Combat Wings is the pinnacle of good air combat!


Prepare for full-on aerial combat in the most incredible battles from the Pacific Theatre of World War II in Heroes of the PacificTM, coming this September for PlayStation 2, Xbox and PC.


Take to the skies in your Hellcat fighter plane and defend the US fleet and blast the enemy out of the skies! This epic opening clash sets in motion a series of great battles that range across the Pacific, including Wake Island, Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima, Midway, Leyte Gulf and the Coral Sea.


BESER, JACOBCitation:The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jacob Beser (0-66), First Lieutenant (Air Corps), U.S. Army Air Force, for gallantry in action while engaged in aerial flight against the Japanese Empire on 6 August 1945. Lieutenant Beser was the Radar Countermeasurers Officer for a combat crew of the B-29 aircraft of the 393d Bombardment Squadron, 509th Composite Group, TWENTIETH Air Force, which flew from a base in the Marianas Islands to drop on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, the first atomic bomb to be used in warfare. Flying 1500 miles over open water to the coast of Japan, they manned their assigned positions and crossed the island of Shikoku and the Inland Sea. They constantly faced the danger of being hit by anti-aircraft fire, enemy fighters, or suffering mechanical or other failures which would intensify the risks of carrying this powerful missile. Throughout the mission the element of hazard from the unknown prevailed, for this was the first time that this bomb, much more destructive than any other in existence, had been dropped from an airplane. The effect it would have on the airplane and these crew members was only to be estimated. Shortly after 0900 they brought the plane in over the city, and at 0915 the bomb release was pressed. The bomb cleared, and fell toward the planned objective. They then headed from the area and, despite a minor effect from the detonation, returned safely to their home base. By their courage and skillful performance of duty achieved in outstanding fashion despite the dangers involved in accomplishment of this historic mission, these individuals distinguished themselves by extraordinary achievement and reflect great credit on themselves and the Army Air Forces.Headquarters, 20th Air Force, General Orders Number 69 (September 22, 1945)


CARON, GEORGE R.Citation:The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George R. Caron (12143134), Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Force, for gallantry in action while engaged in aerial flight against the Japanese Empire on 6 August 1945. Technical Sergeant Caron was Central Fire Control Gunner for a combat crew of the B-29 aircraft of the 393d Bombardment Squadron, 509th Composite Group, TWENTIETH Air Force, which flew from a base in the Marianas Islands to drop on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, the first atomic bomb to be used in warfare. Flying 1500 miles over open water to the coast of Japan, they manned their assigned positions and crossed the island of Shikoku and the Inland Sea. They constantly faced the danger of being hit by anti-aircraft fire, enemy fighters, or suffering mechanical or other failures which would intensify the risks of carrying this powerful missile. Throughout the mission the element of hazard from the unknown prevailed, for this was the first time that this bomb, much more destructive than any other in existence, had been dropped from an airplane. The effect it would have on the airplane and these crew members was only to be estimated. Shortly after 0900 they brought the plane in over the city, and at 0915 the bomb release was pressed. The bomb cleared, and fell toward the planned objective. They then headed from the area and, despite a minor effect from the detonation, returned safely to their home base. By their courage and skillful performance of duty achieved in outstanding fashion despite the dangers involved in accomplishment of this historic mission, these individuals distinguished themselves by extraordinary achievement and reflect great credit on themselves and the Army Air Forces.Headquarters, 20th Air Force, General Orders Number 69 (September 22, 1945)


DUZENBURY, WYATT E.Citation:The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Wyatt E. Duzenbury, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Force, for gallantry in action while engaged in aerial flight against the Japanese Empire on 6 August 1945. Staff Sergeant Duzenbury was the Flight Engineer for a combat crew of the B-29 aircraft of the 393d Bombardment Squadron, 509th Composite Group, TWENTIETH Air Force, which flew from a base in the Marianas Islands to drop on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, the first atomic bomb to be used in warfare. Flying 1500 miles over open water to the coast of Japan, they manned their assigned positions and crossed the island of Shikoku and the Inland Sea. They constantly faced the danger of being hit by anti-aircraft fire, enemy fighters, or suffering mechanical or other failures which would intensify the risks of carrying this powerful missile. Throughout the mission the element of hazard from the unknown prevailed, for this was the first time that this bomb, much more destructive than any other in existence, had been dropped from an airplane. The effect it would have on the airplane and these crew members was only to be estimated. Shortly after 0900 they brought the plane in over the city, and at 0915 the bomb release was pressed. The bomb cleared, and fell toward the planned objective. They then headed from the area and, despite a minor effect from the detonation, returned safely to their home base. By their courage and skillful performance of duty achieved in outstanding fashion despite the dangers involved in accomplishment of this historic mission, these individuals distinguished themselves by extraordinary achievement and reflect great credit on themselves and the Army Air Forces.Headquarters, 20th Air Force, General Orders Number 69 (September 22, 1945)


FEREBEE, THOMAS W.Citation:The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Thomas W. Ferebee (0-543490), Major (Air Corps), U.S. Army Air Force, for gallantry in action while engaged in aerial flight against the Japanese Empire on 6 August 1945. Major Ferebee was the Bombardier for a combat crew of the B-29 aircraft of the 393d Bombardment Squadron, 509th Composite Group, TWENTIETH Air Force, which flew from a base in the Marianas Islands to drop on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, the first atomic bomb to be used in warfare. Flying 1500 miles over open water to the coast of Japan, they manned their assigned positions and crossed the island of Shikoku and the Inland Sea. They constantly faced the danger of being hit by anti-aircraft fire, enemy fighters, or suffering mechanical or other failures which would intensify the risks of carrying this powerful missile. Throughout the mission the element of hazard from the unknown prevailed, for this was the first time that this bomb, much more destructive than any other in existence, had been dropped from an airplane. The effect it would have on the airplane and these crew members was only to be estimated. Shortly after 0900 they brought the plane in over the city, and at 0915 the bomb release was pressed. The bomb cleared, and fell toward the planned objective. They then headed from the area and, despite a minor effect from the detonation, returned safely to their home base. By their courage and skillful performance of duty achieved in outstanding fashion despite the dangers involved in accomplishment of this historic mission, these individuals distinguished themselves by extraordinary achievement and reflect great credit on themselves and the Army Air Forces.Headquarters, 20th Air Force, General Orders Number 69 (September 22, 1945)


JEPPSON, MARRIS R.Citation:The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Marris R. Jeppson, Second Lieutenant (Air Corps), U.S. Army Air Force, for gallantry in action while engaged in aerial flight against the Japanese Empire on 6 August 1945. Second Lieutenant Jeppson was the Electronics Officer for a combat crew of the B-29 aircraft of the 393d Bombardment Squadron, 509th Composite Group, TWENTIETH Air Force, which flew from a base in the Marianas Islands to drop on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, the first atomic bomb to be used in warfare. Flying 1500 miles over open water to the coast of Japan, they manned their assigned positions and crossed the island of Shikoku and the Inland Sea. They constantly faced the danger of being hit by anti-aircraft fire, enemy fighters, or suffering mechanical or other failures which would intensify the risks of carrying this powerful missile. Throughout the mission the element of hazard from the unknown prevailed, for this was the first time that this bomb, much more destructive than any other in existence, had been dropped from an airplane. The effect it would have on the airplane and these crew members was only to be estimated. Shortly after 0900 they brought the plane in over the city, and at 0915 the bomb release was pressed. The bomb cleared, and fell toward the planned objective. They then headed from the area and, despite a minor effect from the detonation, returned safely to their home base. By their courage and skillful performance of duty achieved in outstanding fashion despite the dangers involved in accomplishment of this historic mission, these individuals distinguished themselves by extraordinary achievement and reflect great credit on themselves and the Army Air Forces.Headquarters, 20th Air Force, General Orders Number 69 (September 22, 1945) 041b061a72


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